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WDEL Blog: Allan Loudell

Two Latin American stories getting insufficient attention: Mexican border incursion into Arizona; U.S. creates "Cuban Twitter"

I haven't heard or seen these stories in network newscasts, but these articles deserve greater attention:

Documents obtained by The Los ANGELES TIMES / CHICAGO TRIBUNE's Washington bureau indicating two heavily armed, camouflaged Mexican soldiers crossed into Arizona earlier this year, and reportedly drew their weapons on U.S. Border Patrol agents. Intrigue: Were the Mexican soldiers chasing drug smugglers, or the opposite, protecting drug smugglers?

Does this incident deserve greater attention, or is it the inevitable result of a chaotic international frontier? Well, it's not "Fast & Furious"...

From The L.A. TIMES:


http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-border-mexico-20140402,0,878301.story#axzz2xqaQB9L6


Then, consider an Associated Press account about apparently the latest U.S. Government escapade to undermine Cuba's still-communist government. (You'd think after half a century of trying, Uncle Sam might just try the opposite: Establish normal relations; let U.S. citizens routinely visit Cuba; etc.)

This time, the U.S. Government launched the creation of a "Cuban Twitter", with the eventual intention of undermining the Castro regime. It was constructed with secret shell companies and financed through foreign banks.

From The Associated Press:


http://www.miamiherald.com/2014/04/03/4036402/us-secretly-created-cuban-twitter.html


Posted at 2:17pm on April 3, 2014 by Allan Loudell

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Comments on this post:

mrpizza
Thu, Apr 3, 2014 6:21pm
I think both the media and the public are suffering from news fatigue. With so many things happening simultaneously all over the world, the stories all start to look alike after awhile.

EarlGrey
Thu, Apr 3, 2014 10:16pm
I've read quite a few stories like the L.A. Times story on Drudge... it's happening more and more often.

During one of the other stand-offs between U.S. Border agents and camouflaged men claiming to be Mexican police... the U.S. officers noticed that the names the suspicious men gave did not match the name-tags on their uniforms... sounds like cartel enforcers.


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