WDEL's Delaware Stories
with Mellany Armstrong


New creature comforts on Cape May-Lewes Ferry

An upgrade on the quaint way to cross the Delaware Bay.

The Cape May-Lewes Ferry gets a makeover.

"Laid new flooring, new paint, and then our crews down at the Cape May terminal installed new seating," said Jim Salmon of the Delaware River and Bay Authority.=, which operates the ferry.


Salmon says the seating areas are much more comfortable.

"Now there's booths with six seats in them, the seats recline, there's places to put your cup," he said.

Salmon says passengers got what they asked for.

"One of the big improvements is we added additional outlets so that people can plug in their computers and charge their phones," he said.

Tourists and locals make the scenic 17-mile, 80-minute cruise to popular Delaware and New Jersey shore points.

"What we're trying to do is to position the ferry as a necessary discretionary expense, something that they want to take, not that they have to take," Salmon said.

The ferry has carried more than 40 million passengers since its inception in 1964.



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