Parents could freeze kids' credit to prevent ID theft

Children would be better protected from identity theft under a new measure.

A new bill seeks to allow parents and guardians to freeze their children's credit until they're 16-years-old. Rep. Andria Bennett (D-Dover) is the prime sponsor--she hopes, if this passes, parents will consider freezing their child's credit at child birth.

"As soon as a social security number is assigned, it would be in fact, I would think a good thing, for a parent to just go and freeze it so they don't have to worry about it because things happen between you know you could move, after a few years you may forget," says Bennett.



This would prohibit criminals from opening a line of credit using a child's Social Security number.

Children have become a growing target for identity thieves because of their vulnerability.

"They don't find out until later in life when they go to apply for a credit card, for a student loan, a car, too far long to even catch the people that did it," Bennett says.



Bennett worked with the credit agencies to lower the cost of freezing a credit report for a child from $20 to $5.

House Bill 64 will be heard in the house Economic Development, Banking, Insurance and Commerce.






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