Boston police: Bombing suspect is in custody

Boston Police say a 19-year-old college student wanted in the Boston Marathon bombings is in custody after a manhunt that left the city virtually paralyzed and his older brother and accomplice dead.

Police announced via Twitter that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was in custody. His brother, 26-year-old Tamerlan, was killed Friday in a furious attempt to escape police.

The brothers are suspects in Monday's marathon bombings, which killed three people and wounded more than 180 others. The men are also suspected of killing a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer in his vehicle late Thursday.

Authorities in Boston had suspended all mass transit and warned close to 1 million people in the entire city and some of its suburbs to stay indoors as the hunt for the remaining suspect went on.

3 near college suspect attends being questioned

Police say three people have been taken into custody for questioning at a housing complex where the younger marathon bombing suspect may have lived.

New Bedford Police Lt. Robert Richard says a private complex of off-campus housing at the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth was searched by federal authorities Friday evening.

Richard says the FBI took two males and one female into custody for questioning.

He says 19-year-old suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev may have resided at or was affiliated with the housing complex. He is registered at the school.

Authorities say Tsarnaev was apprehended after a manhunt Friday that paralyzed the Boston area.

Mass. bomb suspect's mom-in-law sickened by attack

The mother-in-law of the Boston Marathon bombing suspect killed during a gun battle with police says her family is "sickened" by the horror he inflicted.

Judith Russell's daughter Katherine was married to Tamerlan Tsarnaev (tsahr-NY'-ev), an ethnic Chechen who came to the U.S. from Russia. She says her family realizes they never really knew him. She said in a statement Friday the family can't begin to comprehend the tragedy.

The Russell family lives on a cul-de-sac in a wooded, suburban neighborhood in North Kingstown, R.I. Neighbor Paula Gillette says Katherine Russell left for college a few years ago and when she came back she would dress in Muslim garb with head coverings.

Tsarnaev and his brother are the suspects in Monday's marathon bombing, which killed three people and wounded more than 180. The brother was captured Friday night.


A glance at the search for Boston bomb suspects

Key moments related to the search for the Boston Marathon bombing suspects, based on reports from the Massachusetts governor, the Middlesex County district attorney, Massachusetts State Police and Boston police.

- At 5:10 p.m. Thursday, investigators of the bombings release photographs and video of two suspects. They ask for the public's help in identifying the men.

- Around 10:20 p.m., shots are fired on the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, just outside Boston.

- At 10:30 p.m., an MIT campus police officer who was responding to a disturbance is found shot multiple times in his vehicle, apparently in a confrontation with the Boston Marathon bombing suspects. He is later pronounced dead.

- Shortly afterward, two armed men reportedly carjack a Mercedes SUV in Cambridge. A man who was in the vehicle is held for about a half hour and then released unharmed at a gas station on Memorial Drive in Cambridge.

- Police soon pursue the carjacked vehicle in Watertown, just west of Cambridge.

- Some kind of explosive devices are thrown from the vehicle in an apparent attempt to stop police. The carjackers and police exchange gunfire. A transit police officer is seriously injured. One suspect, later identified as Suspect No. 1 in the marathon bombings, is critically injured and later pronounced dead.

- Authorities launch a manhunt for the other suspect.

- Around 1 a.m. Friday, gunshots and explosions are heard in Watertown. Dozens of police officers and FBI agents converge on a Watertown neighborhood. A helicopter circles overhead.

- Around 4:30 a.m., Massachusetts state and Boston police tell people living in that section of eastern Watertown to stay in their homes. They identify the carjackers as the same men suspected in the marathon bombings. Overnight, police also release a photograph of a man believed to be Suspect No. 2 wearing a gray hoodie-style sweatshirt. The image apparently is from surveillance video taken at a gas station.

- Around 5:50 a.m. authorities urge residents in Watertown, Newton, Waltham, Belmont, Cambridge, Arlington and the Allston-Brighton neighborhoods of Boston to stay indoors. All mass transit is shut down.

- Around 6:35 a.m., The Associated Press reports that the bomb suspects are from a Russian region near Chechnya and lived in the United States for at least a year.

- Around 6:45 a.m., The Associated Press identifies the surviving Boston bomb suspect as Dzhokhar A. Tsarnaev, 19, who has been living in Cambridge.

- Around 8 a.m., Boston's police commissioner says all of Boston must stay in their homes as the search for the surviving suspect in the bombings continues.

- Around 8:40 a.m., a U.S. law enforcement official and the uncle of the suspects confirm that the name of the slain suspect is Tamerlan Tsarnaev, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev's older brother.

- Around 10:20 a.m., Connecticut State Police say a car believed to be linked to Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has been recovered in Boston. They initially call it a Honda CRV, but authorities later say it was a Honda Civic.

- Around 10:35 a.m., the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth says it closed its campus and ordered an evacuation after confirming that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is registered there. The school says it closed the campus "out of an abundance of caution" as the search continued.

- Around 11:30 a.m., Massachusetts State Police explain that the brothers suspected in the bombings were in the Honda when they carjacked the Mercedes SUV. For a while, each drove one of the two vehicles, but then ditched the Honda and reunited in the Mercedes.

- Around 12:35 p.m., state police in Watertown say officers are searching door-to-door but still have not found the bombing suspect.

- Around 6:30 p.m., Massachusetts Gov. Patrick Deval announces that mass transit is resuming and the "stay indoors" order is being lifted even though one suspect remains on the lam. State police say that suspect, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, fled on foot and there is indication he has a vehicle. They believe he is still in the state because of his ties to the area.

-Around the time the order is lifted, a flurry of gunfire breaks out in the same community that was being searched. Law enforcement officials locate Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in a boat parked behind a home.

-Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is taken into custody by police at approximately 8:45 p.m. Spontaneous applause breaks out among police and onlookers surrounding the scene and residents take to the streets to cheer police.

Official: FBI interviewed older suspect in 2011

A federal law enforcement official says the FBI interviewed the older Boston Marathon bombing suspect at the request of a foreign government in 2011 and that nothing derogatory was found.

The official says the FBI shared its information with the foreign government. The official did not say what country made the request about Tamerlan Tsarnaev or why.

The 26-year-old was killed overnight in a shootout with police outside Boston; his younger brother remains at large.

The official spoke on the condition of anonymity because the person was not authorized to speak about the case publicly.

Classmates: Bomb suspect was on campus this week

Students at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth tell The Associated Press that Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was on campus this week after the bombings.

Tsarnaev is a student at the school, about an hour's drive south of Boston.

Students say he lived on the third floor of a campus dormitory. Harry Danso, who lives on the same floor, tells the AP he saw him in the dorm hallway this week and Tsarnaev was calm.

Authorities are swarming the campus. The school was evacuated Friday morning amid a manhunt for Tsarnaev.

FBI and SWAT teams have been seen on the campus. A Massachusetts State Police armored truck arrived around 1 p.m., and two helicopters were seen arriving earlier.

Congressman: Suspects had cache of explosives

The senior Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee says the two Boston Marathon bombing suspects had collected pipe bombs, grenades and improvised explosive devices before they confronted police. Congressman Dutch Ruppersberger said that the brother who fled after a furious gunfight hurled some of the devices at police as he drove away in a stolen car.

The Maryland Democrat said, "They clearly amassed a small arsenal of explosives."

Ruppersberger, who was briefed by authorities,said U.S. law enforcement and intelligence officials plan to quickly pivot from their search for the surviving suspect to learn whether the brothers had any help or contact from terrorist groups inside or outside the U.S. Ruppersberger said authorities likely will ask Russian officials for evidence in Chechnya and other nearby Russian regions.

Father: Suspect smart and accomplished, a `true angel'

The father of the suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing claims that his son who is still on the loose is a smart and accomplished young man.

Anzor Tsarnaev spoke with The Associated Press by telephone from the Russian city of Makhachkala on Friday after police said one of his sons, 26-year-old Tamerlan, had been killed in a shootout and the other, Dzhokhar, was being intensely pursued.

"My son is a true angel," the elder Tsarnaev said. "Dzhokhar is a second-year medical student in the U.S. He is such an intelligent boy. We expected him to come on holidays here."

FBI at NJ home of sister of Boston bomb suspects

The FBI is at the northern New Jersey home of the sister of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects.

The police director in West New York, N.J., says the woman has told authorities she has not been in frequent touch with her brothers. He says she is very upset.

Police did not have her name.

They have cordoned off the three-story brick building across the Hudson River from New York City.

The woman, speaking through a crack in the door, tells The Star-Ledger of Newark her brothers are smart and great people. She says she doesn't know what got into them.

She also tells the newspaper she is sorry for "all the people who are hurt."

Aunt says US suspect recently became devout Muslim

An aunt of the suspects says the older brother recently became a devout Muslim who prayed five times a day.

Maret Tsarnaeva told reporters at her Toronto home on Friday that her brother Anzor Tsarnaev had high expectations for his sons, especially Tamerlan.

She says her brother was desperate when he found out Tamerlan dropped out of his university.

She says Tamerlan married and had a daughter in the U.S.

She called the boys smart and athletic, and she wants proof they are involved in the bombing.

Gov't sources: Boston bomb suspect went to Russia

Government officials say Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev traveled to Russia last year and returned to the U.S. six months later.

The 26-year-old Tsarnaev died in a police shootout overnight.

The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they couldn't publicly talk about an investigation in progress. One says that Tsarnaev traveled out of John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York.

Investigators believe that Tsarneaev and his brother Dzhokhar are responsible for the deadly Boston Marathon terrorist attack. Dzhokhar is still being sought. The ethnic Chechen brothers are from Dagestan, which neighbors Chechnya in southern Russia. They lived near Boston and had been in the U.S. for about a decade, an uncle said.

One official said there are no known ties at this point to Chechen extremist groups.

Chief: Slain MIT officer was dedicated, well liked

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer said to have been shot and killed by the Boston Marathon bombing suspects has been identified as 26-year-old Sean Collier.

The Middlesex district attorney's office says Collier was a Somerville resident who had worked at MIT since January 2012. Before that, he was a civilian employee of the Somerville Police Department.

MIT Police Chief John DiFava says Collier was a dedicated officer who was liked by his colleagues and the MIT community.

Collier was found shot several times in his vehicle in Cambridge at about 10:30 p.m. Thursday. He was pronounced dead at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Authorities say he was shot by the two suspects in Monday's marathon bombings.

Russia's Caucasus: breeding ground for terror

Militants from Chechnya and other restive regions in Russia's volatile North Caucasus have targeted Moscow and other areas with bombings and hostage-takings, but the allegations of involvement in the Boston Marathon explosions would mark the first time they had conducted a terror attack in the West.

The conflict in Chechnya began in 1994 as a separatist war, but has quickly morphed into an Islamic insurgency whose adepts vow to carve out an independent Islamic state in the Caucasus.

Militants from Chechnya and neighboring provinces have launched a long series of terror attacks in Russia, including a 2002 hostage-taking raid in Moscow's theater, in which 129 hostages died, a 2004 hostage-taking in a school in Beslan that killed more than 330 people, and numerous bombings in Moscow and other cities.

China's Boston bomb victim family remembers child

The family of a Chinese woman killed in the Boston Marathon bombings says it was her dream to study in the United States, and she fell in love with Boston, where she was a graduate student.

In a statement posted on the website of Boston University, the family of 23-year-old Lu Lingzi expressed their grief and called their child "the joy of our lives."

The family, from the city of Shenyang in China's northeast, initially requested privacy and did not want Lu's name released in the first hours after she was declared dead in the bombings on Monday that killed two others and injured more than 170 people.

The official Xinhua News Agency says the parents and two other relatives are leaving Beijing on Friday evening for Boston.

Retiree stops `getting mad' over marathon bombings, tends makeshift memorial

A Massachusetts retiree has channeled his anger over the Boston Marathon bombings into action, becoming the unofficial manager of the makeshift memorial near the attack site.

Each day since Monday's bombings, Ed Starbuck has boarded a bus from his home on Cape Cod to spend the day at the memorial site near the marathon finish line. He thanks those stopping to lay a bouquet or write a message, with many also getting a nuzzle from Starbuck's 5-year-old beagle, Rosie.

Starbuck says the memorial is therapeutic and that the outpouring of grief and support reassures him that things will be OK.

Beyond the flowers and notes, the site includes three white crosses in memory of those who died in the two blasts. A pair of running shoes and a marathon medal also hang from a barricade at the site.

Bombing probe highlights expansion of surveillance

As the investigation into the Boston Marathon bombings shows, it is no longer that easy to get lost in the crowd. There are eyes -- and cameras -- everywhere.

Investigators of Monday's attack quickly got a vast quantity of amateur photos and videos taken by onlookers, often with their cell phones, as well as footage from nearby surveillance cameras.

The upside of the expanding surveillance network may be clear in the greater potential to solve crimes. Lawyer Ben Wizner with the American Civil Liberties Union says the group doesn't object to cameras at high-profile public locales that are potential terrorist targets. What it does have a problem with, he says, is a society where cameras are so pervasive people can't go about their lives without "being recorded and stored in data bases forever."

In the U.S., Chicago already has a comprehensive network of surveillance cameras. Police say the network has drawn few complaints and even the local branch of the ACLU says Chicagoans generally seem at peace with the system -- except for when it results in a traffic ticket.







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